Photo
rhamphotheca:

Planetary Nebulas - Fast Winds From Dying Stars
This panel of composite images shows part of the unfolding drama of the last stages of the evolution of sun-like stars.
Dynamic elongated clouds envelop bubbles of multimillion degree gas produced by high-velocity winds from dying stars. In these images, Chandra’s X-ray data are shown in blue, while green and red are optical and infrared data from Hubble.
Planetary nebulas - so called because some of them resemble a planet when viewed through a small telescope - are produced in the late stages of a sun-like star’s life. After several billion years of stable existence (the sun is 4.5 billion years old and will not enter this phase for about 5 billion more years) a normal star will expand enormously to become a bloated red giant. Over a period of a few hundred thousand years, much of the star’s mass is expelled at a relatively slow speed of about 50,000 miles per hour…
(read more: Chandra X-Ray Observatory)

rhamphotheca:

Planetary Nebulas - Fast Winds From Dying Stars

This panel of composite images shows part of the unfolding drama of the last stages of the evolution of sun-like stars.

Dynamic elongated clouds envelop bubbles of multimillion degree gas produced by high-velocity winds from dying stars. In these images, Chandra’s X-ray data are shown in blue, while green and red are optical and infrared data from Hubble.

Planetary nebulas - so called because some of them resemble a planet when viewed through a small telescope - are produced in the late stages of a sun-like star’s life. After several billion years of stable existence (the sun is 4.5 billion years old and will not enter this phase for about 5 billion more years) a normal star will expand enormously to become a bloated red giant. Over a period of a few hundred thousand years, much of the star’s mass is expelled at a relatively slow speed of about 50,000 miles per hour…

(read more: Chandra X-Ray Observatory)

Photo
rhamphotheca:

Blue-lip Anemonefish (Amphiprion latezonatus), South West Rocks, NSW, Australia.Photograph: Richard Ling/Flickr

rhamphotheca:

Blue-lip Anemonefish (Amphiprion latezonatus), South West Rocks, NSW, Australia.

Photograph: Richard Ling/Flickr

Photo
sinobug:

Prominent Moth (Neopheosia fasciata, Notodontidae)   by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr. Pu’er, Yunnan, China  See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Prominent Moth (Neopheosia fasciata, Notodontidae)

Prominent Moth (Neopheosia fasciata, Notodontidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

Photo
insectlove:

I don’t know much about, but I’m really curious about caterpillars, I found this wonderful one, nearby my house, which is close to Curitiba - PR, Brasil.Is this a phase of a butterfly or moth? does anyone recognizes it?Thank you =)

insectlove:

I don’t know much about, but I’m really curious about caterpillars, I found this wonderful one, nearby my house, which is close to Curitiba - PR, Brasil.
Is this a phase of a butterfly or moth? does anyone recognizes it?
Thank you =)

Photo
Link

(Source: rhamphotheca)

Photo
fullcravings:

Biscuit Beignets
Photoset

cool-critters:

Raspberry crab (Nucia speciosa)

These are some really teeny tiny crabs. Its is a Red Leucosiid Crab. Sadly I couldnt find any further informations about this berry cute crabs.

photo credits: TC Wang & DR. WJ, Arthur Anker

(via rhamphotheca)

Photo
fuckyeahbranchs:

Nudibranch by Timothy Willis on Flickr.
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dorianslover said: The animals found on the ocean floor at these incredible depths are just astonishing. Like the that weird orange fish. Or the frill shark. They're almost too strange to be real, but too weird to be fiction.

rhamphotheca:

:3 :3 :3 :3 :3 :3 :3